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PocketPals

PNC Service Design Project


In my Service Design class (under the Human-Computer Interaction Institute), we were tasked with a client, PNC Bank, to create a solution in order to co-create value between them and their target customer: local teenagers. My team met with two PNC representatives consistently throughout the semester and with guidance from our instructors John Zimmerman and Jodi Forlizzi to create a final porposal that included a prototype, research document, service blueprint, and customer journey map.
Teammates
Selin Insel, Daphne Tan, Helen Wu, and Xu Zheng
Timeline
October — December 2017
Role
UX Design and Research
Client Prompt
Conceive of and design future services that leverage data to help parents and teens have a dialogue about family finances. Explore how to offer bundled services that benefit families by enabling them to save, budget, and realize their financial goals.

Phase 1: Discovery

In the discovery phase, we started first with secondary research to get a general sense of the space we were working in. This research was comprised of scholarly articles on financially motivations in teens as well as financial education, as well evaluations of current products and the use behidn them. We then moved next into some basic interviews with local teens and parents in our community.
Research Findings
State mandates requiring high school students to take personal finance courses have no effect on savings or investment behavior. Meanwhile, a person’s personal finance habits are largely learned from his/her parents. Teens between the ages 12-17 get their most of their money from parents in the shape of allowance or cash as needed. They spend most of it on food, clothing and electronics/video games.
Interview Findings

Teens:

  • Go to their parents first when they have questions about money.
  • Like immediate and tangible connections when it comes to "managing" their finances, such as keeping receipts and calling the bank to ask what their account balance is.
  • Do not explore new bank options. They simply open bank accounts with their parents’ bank.
  • Rely on their parents to gain access to cash.
Parents:
  • Don't know how much to give to the teen for their allowance.
  • Want them to make financial decisions independently but also have oversight of their spending habits.
  • Hope teens make safe mistakes now before going to college.
  • Unlikely to switch banks for their teen because they are deeply rooted at their current bank.
  • Don’t know how to communicate more complex financial concepts in a way that is easy to understand for their teen.


From here my team consolidated began synthesizing our findings with models in order to get a better understanding of the space around PNC and teens.



Afterwards we created a final stakeholder map and value flow model:

Phase 2: Design

Once we made our stakeholder map, value flow model, and personas, are team went into the problem and collectively brainstormed 30 ideas together. Afterwards we narrowed down to 5 main ideas.

Co-Designed Credit Card
Teens and parents decide on the rules and consequences of a credit card. Continued conversations about spending habits and best practices
Receipt Logger
Encourage teens to log past purchases by taking a picture of their receipts. Generalizes visual reports on spending habits by category
Facebook Meme Page
Teens post financially accurate memes online and tag each other
Chatbot Customer UI
TA chatbot us built to answer any money related questions that a teen might have (What is the current balance? What does interest mean?...)
Virtual Pet Planner
A gamified representation of financial actions that a younger teen takes. Maintain pet health and happiness through good financial decisions

Speed Dating

With our five ideas, our team created storyboards and went into the field to speed date with teenagers. We did two rounds of speed dating, the second narrowing down to just three storyboards based off the results of the first. Teens ranged in age from 12-16 and were found in cafes, shops, and around their school.

First Round:
Teens loved the idea of a personalized credit card where they were able to determine the rules with their parents. What they loved most about were getting to have a card and being on the same page with their parents. They also were excited by our pet idea, feeling as though that would make finance fun and less intimidating. Parents, on the other hand, liked the idea of determining the rules of the credit card. They also liked the pets idea, but saw little value for them personally.

After this round, our team met again and discussed what new service concepts we could introduce or how we couldedit our existing ones that we still felt had both business value for PNC and a clear benefit for teens. Our teamreally wanted to address the needs of PNC and teens through a hybrid solution that utilized physical and digital engagement.As a result, we chose to keep the pet idea and we added two ideas to the mix. Once again, we created storyboards for the two additional ideas to prepare for yet another round of speed dating.
Second Round

This round of speed dating continued to validate the debit/credit card and pet idea. The results led us to focus more on strengthening the relationship between teens and PNC. We decided to commit to the pet idea but expand the concepts and mechanisms so it would appeal to both boys and girls. Other changes include making the service an onboarding game for teens from the ages of 13 to 16. We wanted to serve teens who just opened accounts with PNC and needed guidance on how to use their new debit card.

Choosing an Idea
This round of speed dating continued to validate the debit/credit card and pet idea. The results led us to focus more on strengthening the relationship between teens and PNC. We decided to commit to the pet idea but expand the concepts and mechanisms so it would appeal to both boys and girls. Other changes include making the service an onboarding game for teens from the ages of 13 to 16. We wanted to serve teens who just opened accounts with PNC and needed guidance on how to use their new debit card.

Phase 3: Refine

Service Idea Overview
Pocket Pals is a digital financial service that connects PNC with teens directly. As mobile banking usage rises year over year, it becomes ever more important to educate and push teens towards better understanding digital currency mechanisms. The impact of mobile technology on daily interactions is undeniable. And so, PNC must move along that shift in communication preferences to establish relationships with teens as potential lifelong customers.

Pocket Pals focuses on offering teens financial guidance and education in a friendly, personable manner. It is an onboarding program that lasts at minimum for 2 weeks and finishes within 30 days, teens download the app upon signing up for a new debit card with PNC.

Program Details
To start using the app, teens choose from 3 different pals--pet, robot, or dragon--to take care of. The pet begins as a baby, and will physically grow as teens reflect healthy financial habits during the onboarding program. The pet tasks the teen with becoming familiar with different components of the debit card, such as the card number, expiration date, security code, and using the ATM.


To teach financial concepts, the pet gives teens tasks and short explanations of why those tasks are important--such as setting up a college fund or saving 5% of their allowance for a future “need.” Aside from financial concepts the pet also gives some tasks related to using an electronic bank account such as depositing a check or sharing their account number with their parent. Every time the teen makes good financial decisions, such as saving a portion of their allowance, staying within budgets, or never overdrafting, the pet gets a reward and grows in size. Rewards the pet can get are snacks, new toys, or the ability to do a new trick.


Along with our mobile service prototype, we created a customer journey map and service blueprint to show how our solution fits in.